BLOGS

Innovations

Sustaining the Rising Tide of Black Co-ops: An Ecosystem Approach

Sustaining the Rising Tide of Black Co-ops: An Ecosystem Approach   Cooperatives have long been on the Black liberation checklist. By now, anyone who has read anything on cooperatives has come across the research of Jessica Gordon-Nembhard and her seminal 2014 book, Collective Courage. In it, she unearths the long line of Black co-op organizing in the US going as far back as the Underground Railroad, weaving together a cooperative “Who’s Who” of the Black civil rights pantheon in the process. It would seem that the popularization of the cooperative side of Black luminaries like Ella Baker, WEB DuBois, and Fannie Lou Hamer would challenge the misguided view that Black folks have little experience with cooperatives. However, the depths of anti-Black stereotypes around the world make this history hard for many to believe. Black folks are not supposed to be entrepreneurial or cooperative, no matter where we’re from in the African diaspora. Throughout the Americas, public narratives of Black life generally depict Black people as either lazy (a nicer way to put it is, always ready for a good time) or violent. Such narratives justified the social control needed to drive every plantation economy from the United States to Chile and Argentina. We are seen as either a drain or a danger—both traits that would doom any cooperative enterprise—making it difficult for most to see what should be obvious, namely, that Black people in the United States, throughout the Americas, and on the African continent have a deep and long history of pooling meager resources to meet collective needs. We cannot see what our minds will not allow us to see, even when it’s right before our very eyes. Let Chicago Grassroots Innovation Blog help you find funding for your ideas, Family, business, Non Profit or Neighborhood

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Innovations

Slutty Vegan’s Pinky Cole Goes From Once Working As A Dasher To Being Appointed As Chief Restaurant Advisor At DoorDash

. Cole’s new role comes on the heels of one of her latest achievements. In May, Slutty Vegan raised $25 million in a Series A funding round — bringing its valuation to $100 million — as previously shared by AfroTech.   https://afrotech.com/pinky-cole-doordash-chief-restaurant-advisor Let Chicago Grassroots Innovation Blog help you find funding for your ideas, Family, business, Non Profit or Neighborhood

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Innovations

To Build a Public Safety That Protects Black Women and Girls, Money isn’t the Only Resource We Need

A Framework for Making the Visible Invisible Narratives are part of the activist’s toolbox of symbolic resources, and indeed, the Black Lives Matter movement has changed many of the narratives around Black people, crime, and policing. The movement has embraced a framework of narrative power, whereby social movements take advantage of political opportunities to construct counter narratives that disrupt hegemonic thinking and expand collective perceptions of what is socially, economically, and politically possible. Narrative power goes beyond a cursory understanding of a problem, using symbolic resources—including ethical storytelling—to radically shape the rules and norms by which we live. This type of analysis has its roots in Black feminism. A framework that insists on the simultaneous eradication of racism, sexism, and classism, Black feminism articulates Black women’s experiences where the feminist and civil rights movements failed to do so, making the invisible visible through intersectional analysis and storytelling. Indeed, Black feminism inspired intersectionality, the recognition that many of us hold concurrent identities that impact our lives. Today, Black feminism continues to expand as a framework, as organizers and thinkers like Charlene Carruthers build on it by making explicit the influence of queerness in the politic of reimaging society away from patriarchal sexism and anti-Black racism.13 https://nonprofitquarterly.org/to-build-a-public-safety-that-protects-black-women-and-girls-money-isnt-the-only-resource-we-need/ Let Chicago Grassroots Innovation Blog help you find funding for your ideas, Family, business, Non Profit or Neighborhood

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Innovations

Sam Gilliam, Abstract Artist innovator

Sam Gilliam, Abstract Artist of Drape Paintings, Dies at 88 A brilliant colorist, he hung his canvases from ceilings in great curves and loops, or pinned them, gathered, to walls, taking his medium into three dimensions. “https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/27/arts/sam-gilliam-dead.html?referringSource=articleShare” Let Chicago Grassroots Innovation Blog help you find funding for your ideas, Family, business, Non Profit or Neighborhood

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Innovations

Women of color will be most impacted by the end of Roe, experts say

Not all states report racial and ethnic data on abortion, but among those who do (29 states and D.C.), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found that a disproportionately high share are women of color. In 2019, the abortion rate for Black women was 23.8 per 1,000 women. For Hispanic women, it was 11.7 per 1,000. And for women, it was 6.6 per 1,000. Tahira Henson, 19, and Vinod Akunuri, 22, embrace during an abortion rights rally near the Supreme Court on June 24. (Eric Lee for The Washington Post)
By Anne Branigin and Samantha Chery
June 24, 2022 at 7:04 p.m. CT
Her entire life, Christina Mitchell has lived with Roe as the law of the land. On Friday morning, the 23-year-old was on her way out for a run in Houston. As she was about to walk out the door, her mother delivered the news: The Supreme Court had just overturned the fundamental right to an abortion.
“My initial reaction was shock,” said Mitchell, a law student at Southern University and A&M College in Baton Rouge. This year, Mitchell, who is Black, had traveled to D.C. to celebrate Ketanji Brown Jackson’s confirmation to the Supreme Court. Among a throng of supporters, she cheered and chanted and held up signs supporting the court’s first Black female justice.
Now, what Mitchell feels the most is uncertainty in the wake of the Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization decision. She viewed abortion as the Supreme Court had laid it out in its 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling: a fundamental right giving women the power to exercise control over their bodies.
While Mitchell lives in a state where abortion is banned, she doesn’t believe that will affect her: She is religious and doesn’t foresee getting an abortion herself, she said.
But Mitchell is clear about who will be most impacted by Dobbs. “It’s going to affect Black women more,” she said.
[Supreme Court reversal leaves states free to outlaw abortion]
All sides of the abortion rights debate have acknowledged that women

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Innovations

BARBARA OAKLEY: How to turn information into intelligence

A very important idea that people are often unaware of is the fact that we have two completely different ways of seeing the world, two different neural networks we access when we’re perceiving things. How to turn information into intelligence Having trouble learning? A PhD engineering professor gives you one key tip. Let Chicago Grassroots Innovation Blog help you find funding for your ideas, Family, business, Non Profit or Neighborhood

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Innovations

2 Health Care Founders Share Their Best Advice for New Entrepreneurs

1,094 views Nov 20, 2020 Toyin Ajayi, co-founder and Chief Health Officer of Cityblock Health, and Iman Abuzeid, co-founder and CEO of Incredible Health, discuss what the next 12 months looks like in the industry and their top advice for new entrepreneurs. Let Chicago Grassroots Innovation Blog help you find funding for your ideas, Family, business, Non Profit or Neighborhood

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Innovations

Looking for community health workers

Are you interested in reducing health disparities in low-income communities? Info@brianlbanks.com Let Chicago Grassroots Innovation Blog help you find funding for your ideas, Family, business, Non Profit or Neighborhood

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