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Innovations

‘It’s a human right to have access to doctors’: Giannis Antetokounmpo invests in telehealth company

Giannis Antetokounmpo is currently in Greece, playing for the Greek national basketball team in early stages of the International Basketball Federation’s EuroBasket tournament, Europe’s premier basketball competition. His brothers Thanasis and Kostas are on the team, also, and youngest brother Alex was part of the training camp roster. Through Greek news conferences and social media posts, it is clear how much fun the two-time NBA most valuable player is having playing with his brothers for his home country. He’s a global superstar and a folk hero whose visage is on the team plane. Yet he has never forgotten how his journey began, shaping the steps he’s taken since – which currently includes the investment in and advocacy for a telehealth company called Antidote Health. “Affordable health care for all, no matter where you are from – race, circumstance, location,” he said of why he got involved with the startup company. “Having access to affordable health care for all. It’s something that growing up we didn’t have, me and my family obviously being an immigrant illegally in Greece we weren’t able to have that. “I could see it in my mom and dad’s eye that they were terrified when I was like ‘oh, my stomach hurt.’ Or, I have a headache or whatever the case may be. Or dad, ‘my hand, my wrist hurt.’ They were terrified. They were like what are we going to do? We have to find a way to treat this ourselves, you know? But just being able to allow all those people that don’t have healthcare, that don’t have access to it, to give it to them, put it in front of them. “I believe you leave the world in a better place and at the end of the day that’s what I want to do. I want to create the opportunity for people to reach their true potential and if I can help a little bit in that I can be happy.” Antetokounmpo spoke with the Journal Sentinel just before heading to Greece

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Innovations

Mohsin Hamid on The Last White Man: ‘If migration was accepted, I wouldn’t need to write what I do’

The first line of Mohsin Hamid’s new novel, The Last White Man, might just be the most intriguing of any published this year. “One morning Anders, a white man, woke up to find he had turned a deep and undeniable brown.”  If it is the job of a writer to turn out prose that encourages the reader to read one sentence after the next, eager to turn the pages and to learn more, then Hamid deserves a promotion at the very least. The Last White Man is a Kafkaesque nightmare that takes place in an unnamed city where racism continues to divide – even within societies that otherwise like to pride themselves on egalitarianism.  Written in a flurry of propulsive, comma-laden sentences: “To his boss, Anders explained his situation, which was not unique, nor contagious, as far as anyone knew, and returned to the gym after a week off, and his boss was waiting for him at the entrance, bigger than Anders remembered him, though obviously the same size, and his boss looked him over and said, ‘I would have killed myself’” – Hamid’s novel can at times feel suffocating, and is not an easy read. But then that might be the point. By changing skin colour, Anders becomes a stranger not only to himself but to his girlfriend, his boss, his own father. Others endure the same transformation, making headline news across the world. People start rioting in the streets, the remaining whites taking objection to the newly brown. Anders cowers. For a while, it all looks like Armageddon.  “I think that we’re living in a moment where we’re seeing a real fetishisation of purity, a kind of tribalism – you know, who is really British, who is really American, who is really Pakistani, and are you British enough, are you Muslim enough?” Hamid says, as expansive in conversation – on video from his home in New York – as he is economical in print. (None of his five novels to date are much over 200 pages; this new one runs to a tight 180.)

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Innovations

Barack and Michelle Obama Make Surprise Appearance at Martha’s Vineyard African American Film Festival for Netflix Doc ‘Descendant’

The 2022 Martha’s Vineyard African American Film Festival (MVAAFF) kicked off Friday with great pomp and circumstance — and a few bars of “Hail to the Chief” — as Barack and Michelle Obama made a special appearance for the opening night screening of Netflix documentary “Descendant.” When Netflix acquired worldwide rights to the Sundance award-winning documentary in January, the Obamas’ production company Higher Ground signed on to present the feature alongside the streamer and Participant. The documentary, which earned the U.S. special jury award for creative vision at Sundance, is set to launch on the streamer later this year. More from Variety Tyler Perry, Ahmir ‘Questlove’ Thompson, Rev. Al Sharpton and Kasi Lemmons to Appear at 20th Martha’s Vineyard African American Film Fest (EXCLUSIVE) Barack Obama Explores ‘Our Great National Parks’ in First Trailer for Netflix Docuseries Netflix, Higher Ground Acquires Sundance Award Winner ‘Descendant’ Directed by Margaret Brown (“The Order of Myths,” “Be Here to Love Me: Townes Van Zandt,” “The Great Invisible”), the documentary follows members of Africatown, a small community in Alabama, as they share their personal stories and community history as descendants of the Clotilda, the last known ship carrying enslaved Africans to the United States. The ship arrived in America 40 years after African slave trading became a capital offense. It was promptly burned and its existence denied, but “after a century shrouded in secrecy and speculation, descendants of the Clotilda’s survivors are reclaiming their story,” according to the film’s logline. For nearly 15 minutes, the former president and first lady held the audience’s attention as they preached the importance of uncovering untold history and their aim to support projects that do just that, like “Descendant,” through their Higher Ground banner. “When we screened this… we looked at it and immediately thought, ‘This is why we’re doing Higher Ground.’ Because what we know about our history as Black people, we don’t talk about nothing. We can’t get anything out of our elders, can we? We don’t know anything,” Michelle

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Innovations

Dr. Myron L. Rolle: The 2% Way: How a Philosophy of Small Improvements Took Me to Oxford, the NFL, and Neurosurgery

 Dr. Myron L. Rolle is a former NFL safety, a Rhodes Scholar, and a neurosurgery resident and Global Neurosurgery Fellow at Harvard-Massachusetts General Hospital. Below he  shares 5 key insights from his new book, The 2% Way: How a Philosophy of Small Improvements Took Me to Oxford, the NFL, and Neurosurgery. The 2% Way: How a Philosophy of Small Improvements Took Me to Oxford, the NFL, and Neurosurgery by Myron Rolle 1. Incremental improvements lead to bigger, longer-lasting results.When I was a recruit at Florida State University, defensive coordinator Mickey Andrews demanded tangible progress, even if it was small, at every practice. He would yell at us players: “Someone at Alabama or Clemson is working just as hard as you. I need you to be 2% better than them in some way!” It was a football concept that originated with the legendary college coach Paul “Bear” Bryant. Once I realized the power of the 2% Way in football, I extended it to every aspect of my life. For example, most people don’t realize that being able to perform in front of thousands of fans who watch every move is a unique kind of pressure. They don’t know that playing football primes you for neurosurgery. I personally learned that both require a kind of diligence that borders on fanaticism—for me, that involved making small, 2% changes every day to achieve the dreams that I wrote down in my 5th grade spiral notebook. The 2% Way can become the foundation for your success in life, too: modest increments, calibrated correctly, can make big dreams attainable, and immense progress possible. 2. Life is a journey, and you will grow from one station to the next.Society doesn’t prepare athletes to think about life after football, but I learned that it is possible—and critical to athletes’ mental health—to have a blueprint for success off the field. Similarly, in other career fields, people may not stick with the same thing forever—they strategically diversify. There will be opportunities to

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Innovations

The second richest NBA player ever explains the secret to his success

After selling his Wendy’s and Chilli’s franchises in 2016, Bridgeman became an independent bottler for Coca-Cola. Not bad for a guy who was one of the guys the Los Angeles Lakers traded for Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. VIRGIL VILLANUEVA   Junior Bridgeman © Malcolm Emmons – USA TODAY Sports   The name Junior Bridgeman might ring a bell to some. After being drafted eighth overall pick in the 1975 NBA Draft, he was one of the guys the Los Angeles Lakers traded for Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. While Bridgeman had a decent 12-year NBA career, he didn’t necessarily establish a name because of basketball. Rather, it was his entrepreneurial chops that catapulted him to fame. His highest single-season salary in the NBA was $350,000. Now, Bridgeman’s net worth is estimated at $600 million. This makes him the second-richest NBA player next to the GOAT, Michael Jordan, whose net worth is pegged at $1.7 billion. He’s probably the richest NBA player you’ve never heard of. Roots of the riches Bridgeman’s entrepreneurial chops were honed, in one way or another, through his stint as the National Basketball Players Association president. This was where he learned the art of listening and negotiation. These were key skills he had to utilize and develop early on. He served as a bridge between the players and team owners. Both parties do not always agree on things, nor do they speak the same language. And so, Bridgeman’s middleman act exposed him to different perspectives and thus a broader worldview. He also realized, through the owners, that the ultimate joy for them comes from “making and creating something successful.” This newfound knowledge, coupled with the realization that professional ball is a temporary pursuit, triggered the former Bucks forward to buy a Wendy’s franchise in Milwaukee. After hanging up his jersey for good in 1987, he already had three Wendy’s franchises. By 2016, the former Bucks swingman already had over 200 Wendy’s franchises and 100 Chili’s franchises across the US. Business Philosophy The goal of every business is

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Innovations

A tale of two pandemics: A nonfiction comic about historical racial health disparities

HEALTH, RACE & GENDER A tale of two pandemics: A nonfiction comic about historical racial health disparities Researchers at Johns Hopkins University delved into racial health disparities during the 1918 influenza pandemic — and what history can teach us about how to approach the current pandemic. by Josh Neufeld | November 16, 2020 |comics journalism,coronavirus,health disparities,misinformation FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditEmail About this piece: In a “A Tale of Two Pandemics: Historical Insights on Persistent Racial Disparities,” Josh Neufeld uses the form of comics journalism to highlight a recent research article published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The comic draws on the research article itself, along with additional sources — including interviews with co-authors Lakshmi Krishnan, S. Michelle Ogunwole and Lisa A. Cooper. The three medical doctors are the main characters of the comic, which explains racial health disparities and the spread of misinformation during the coronavirus pandemic and the 1918 influenza pandemic. The doctors’ speech-bubble quotes come directly from their interviews with Neufeld. The text in rectangular boxes comprises Neufeld’s own narrative — except in cases when he uses quotation marks to denote a direct quotation. In cases where Neufeld quotes directly from the doctors’ research article, he depicts the authors speaking in unison — akin to a Greek chorus. “I let their voices guide the narrative,” Neufeld says. “I’m so grateful that they spoke to me about their article!” The social media posts featured in the comic are quoted verbatim from actual posts, and many of the drawings are based on news photos — such as Associated Press photographer Bebeto Matthews’ images of people waiting in line for face masks and food in New York last April. For more on Josh Neufeld’s comics journalism process, please see our companion Q&A. This piece is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivatives 4.0 International License, which means you’re welcome to republish it, provided you credit and link back to the original source. For educators, editors and anyone else who would like to republish it in print, we are providing access to a high-resolution PDF here: Download a high-resolution

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Innovations

A future NBA billionaire was just drafted. He’s the first of many more to come

Mike VorkunovJul 19, 2022Last month, as player after player crossed the stage at the 2022 NBA draft, the league ushered in another tranche of future stars and franchise bedrocks. It also was initiating a new generation of wealth across the sport. While much was made of LeBron James’ ascent last month into the billionaire class, joining only Michael Jordan as current or former NBA players to reach that threshold, the NBA is about to start creating billionaires more rapidly. Starting with this rookie class, the NBA could start minting one or more possible billionaires each year. Any player who enters the league this year — from No. 1 pick Paolo Banchero to any undrafted player — could end up making more than $1 billion in just NBA contracts alone, and that player won’t have to be an all-time legend like James or Jordan to do it. This development is a reflection of the money circulating around the league and doesn’t even take into account all the money players can make off the court, from shoe deals to other endorsements or their own investments. The NBA had $8.892 billion in basketball-related income during the 2021-22 season and next season’s salary cap will exceed initial expectations. While stars like Damian Lillard and Nikola Jokic signed boffo extensions this offseason — Lillard agreed to a two-year, projected $120 million deal, while Jokic’s five-year extension is targeted at $260-plus million — there is much more to come, and that pool of money will become available to players who might not even be top-10 or -15 players in the sport. “There’s just been this trajectory that’s been going on since the birth of professional sports, really,” Mark Bartelstein, a longtime NBA power agent, said. “Thirty years ago we said, ‘Oh my God, the contracts these guys are signing, we can’t believe they can make this kind of money.’ You’ve got generational wealth. Ten years later it’s, ‘I never thought contracts would get to this level.’ Five years ago we said the same thing and now we’re

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Innovations

We Know How to Prevent Gun Violence. Now We Need to Scale It.

Chicago CRED proceeds from the belief that the individuals most at risk are not the problem—they are the solution. By Arne Duncan Jul. 14, 2022 (Photo courtesy of Chicago CRED) The City of Chicago is the undisputed gun violence capital of America. Last year, the city saw nearly as many shootings and killings as New York and Los Angeles combined, despite having barely a fifth of their combined population. While several other cities have higher per-capita murder rates, the sheer number of shootings in Chicago—more than 4,400 in 2021, including 800 homicides—places my hometown at the epicenter of America’s gun violence epidemic. Yet, I am hopeful. For the last six years, through the organization I founded, Chicago CRED, I have been working with men and women at extreme high risk of shooting or being shot. Many have been in and out of the criminal justice system; many have been shot; most have lost loved ones. All of them have witnessed levels of violence that would traumatize the most seasoned soldiers. And like soldiers in battle, they are just trying to survive—to feed and house themselves and their families and to stay safe in their communities. Their upbringings were often marred by any number of adverse experiences: substance abuse, domestic abuse, homelessness, mental health struggles, joblessness, educational failure, or hunger. Most were driven to the streets by the same human desires we all have—camaraderie, validation, security, and love. They are the most extraordinary people I have ever known. Their resilience and commitment to transforming their lives and their communities in the face of overwhelming obstacles inspires me every single day. Chicago CRED Founded in 2016, Chicago CRED (short for Create Real Economic Destiny) proceeds from the belief that the surest way to stop gun violence is engaging directly with those most at risk of shooting or being shot and giving them a reason to put down their guns. Said another way, we believe that the individuals we work with are not the problem—they are the solution. They

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Innovations

Visualizing the $100 Trillion Global Economy in One Chart

Surpassing the $100 trillion mark is a new milestone for global economic output. We’ve covered this topic in the past when the world’s GDP was $88 trillion (2020) and then $94 trillion (2021), and now according to the latest projections, the IMF expects the global economy to reach nearly $104 trillion in nominal value by the end of 2022. Although growth keeps trending upwards, the recovery that was expected in the post-pandemic period is looking strained. Because of recent conflicts, supply chain bottlenecks, and subsequent inflation, global economic projections are getting revised downwards. Global annual GDP growth for 2022 was initially projected to be 4.4% as of January, but this has since been adjusted to 3.6%. Note: This data from the IMF represents the most recent nominal projections for end of year as of April 2022. ℹ️ Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is a broad indicator of the economic activity within a country. It measures the total value of economic output—goods and services—produced within a given time frame by both the private and public sectors. The Top 50 Countries The United States is still the economic leader worldwide, with a GDP of $25.3 trillion—making up nearly one quarter of the global economy. China follows close behind at $19.9 trillion. Here’s a look at the top 50 countries in terms of GDP: Search: Rank Country GDP (current prices, USD) #1 United States $25.3 trillion #2 China $19.9 trillion #3 Japan $4.9 trillion #4 Germany $4.3 trillion #5 United Kingdom $3.4 trillion #6 India $3.3 trillion #7 France $2.9 trillion #8 Canada $2.2 trillion #9 Italy $2.1 trillion #10 Brazil $1.8 trillion Showing 1 to 10 of 50 entriesPreviousNext The frontrunner in Europe is Germany at $4.3 trillion, with the UK coming in second place. One significant change since the last reported figures is that Brazil now cracks the top 10, having surpassed South Korea. Russia falls just outside, in 11th place, with a GDP of $1.8 trillion. While China’s GDP growth has slowed in recent

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